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Flipnote Studio DSi-Ware Guide

16/06/2010 Family Family Gamer Guide
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Flipnote Studio DSi-Ware

Flipnote Studio

Format:
DSi-Ware

Genre:
Improvement

Further reading:
Self improvement

Buy/Support:
Support Andy, click to buy via us...


Flipnote Studio is a free DSi-Ware app where you can create animations. A simple flip book interface and intuitive copy, paste and share tools enables players of any ages to animate.

It's one of those type of game genres...

Self improvement games tap into the popular trend in exercise, workouts and therapy. Experiences as diverse as Brain Training on Nintendo DS and Wii-Fit on the Nintendo Wii have popularised the idea that games can be about more than just having fun - they can improve your brain, body and even mental outlook on life.

But why is it any better than the others...

Flipnote Studio is unlike other DSi-Ware games because it is creative. Rather than experience something pre-made, players have to invest imagination and time. Those that do will soon find they can create animated stories quite easily.

Although flick book applications are not unusual on other formats, this DSI-Ware game excels because of its simplicity. It's no mean feat to take all the technical steps involved in drawing, editing and adding sound to an animation and making it easy.

So what experience should I play this game for...

Players will be drawn to Flipnote Studio because it is free and novel. But before long they will realise that this simple tool is quite powerful. Players can copy frames, use a light-box, add sound through the DSi microphone and then share their creations with their friends either locally or online.

The Flipnote Hatena website can be accessed either in the application or via an Internet browser. There, players can publish their work and comment on other entries.

And when can I take a break...

You can save your efforts whenever you like. A good few hours is required before you have mastered the tools included in the game. Thereafter the amount of playtime is only limited by your imagination and ambitions.

This is a great game for who...

Although very young players (under 5's) may struggle with the technicalities involved, with help they can still enjoy seeing their pictures come to life. Slightly older children will find the simple controls and ability to add sound to their creates both intriguing and hilarious.

Intermediate players will enjoy putting real effort into creating original animated stories with Flipnote Studio. The ability to share and browse animations with others is also very appealing - some will get lost in the animated archives for hours.

Expert players may find the simplicity here a little too much to take seriously. Although games like Little Big Planet and Wario Ware DIY offer a more obviously diverse set of options to create your own games, Flipnote Studio's simple tools are capable of creating something just as complex and imaginative.

Written by Andy Robertson

You can support Andy by buying Flipnote Studio



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Andy Robertson writes the Family Gamer column.

"Videogame reviews for the whole family, not just the kids. I dig out videogame experiences to intrigue and interest grownups and children. This is post-hardcore gaming where accessibility, emotion and storytelling are as important as realism, explosions and bravado."


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Written by Andy Robertson

You can support Andy by buying Flipnote Studio



Subscribe to this column:
RSS | Newsletter

Share this review:

Andy Robertson writes the Family Gamer column.

"Videogame reviews for the whole family, not just the kids. I dig out videogame experiences to intrigue and interest grownups and children. This is post-hardcore gaming where accessibility, emotion and storytelling are as important as realism, explosions and bravado."

Here are the games I've been playing recently:




© GamePeople 2006-13 | Contact | Huh?

Grown up gaming?

Home | About | Radio shows | Columnists | Competitions | Contact

RSS | Email | Twitter | Facebook

With so many different perspectives it can be hard to know where to start - a little like walking into a crowded pub. Sorry about that.

But so far we've not found a way to streamline our review output - there's basically too much of it. So, rather than dilute things for newcomers we have decided to live with the hubbub while helping new readers find the columnists they will enjoy.

What sort of gamer are you?

Our columnists each focus on a particular perspective and fall into one of the following types of gamers: